Dachshund Lab Mix: 7 Fun Facts You Need To Know

A Dachshund Lab Mix is the cross between a Dachshund and the ever-popular Labrador Retriever. The combination of these two very different dogs makes for a very interesting mix.

When you pair a Dachshund and a Lab you get a hunter and a retriever all in one. This mix balances out a Dachshund’s hunting instincts with the endless loyalty of a Labrador.

It can be difficult to determine how your mix will turn out.

One thing you can be sure of is that you will have a loyal and eager companion always ready to face each day right by your side.

If you are thinking of introducing one to your family, keep reading to learn how to take care of this unique little cross.

Lab Puppy

What is a Dachshund Lab Mix? (Overview)

The Dachshund Lab mix is the product of a pair between a Dachshund and a Labrador Retriever. They are also known as a Dachsador or Doxidor and are classified as a hybrid (just like any other mix).

Despite the hunting background of both parent breeds, this pooch was not specifically bred with hunting in mind. It was meant to be a household companion and to combine the best traits of both parent breeds.

If all goes well you will have the perfect balance of a Lab’s unconditional loyalty and friendliness plus the Dachshund’s hardworking nature.

With one of these eccentric mixes you never know just how much of either parent breed you will get.

Your pup may be a Wiener shaped Lab or a tall lanky Dachshund.

  • Overview: Hybrid (Dachshund/Labrador Retriever).
  • Purpose: Companion.
  • Weight: 30-40 pounds.
  • Size: 15-25 inches.
  • Temperament: Eccentric, loyal and talkative.

Pros and Cons

Pros:

  • Extremely loyal and friendly.
  • Very unique and attractive appearance.
  • Intelligent and fast learner.
  • Craves the love and attention of its family.

Cons:

  • Very frequent and obnoxious barking.
  • Can develop an aggressive or rude streak.
  • Housebreaking can be difficult.
  • Prone to anxiety and stress.

Dachshund Lab Mix Appearance

Dachshund Lab Mix

Dachshund Lab Mixes have a very unique and varied appearance with so many attractive builds and color forms.

They usually have a short and fine single coat, but some have longer and wavier coats.

With no breed standard (and their parents looking so different) the possibilities are absolutely endless in a mix like this.

You might find a pup with the stout little body of a Dachshund or the longer, leaner build of a Labrador. They may have the Lab’s iconic built in grin, or the Dachshund’s snooty long nose and muzzle. Their ears are long and floppy and their big dark eyes are full of personality.

Height and Weight

These dogs can stand anywhere between 15 and 25 inches and can weigh anywhere from 30 to 40 pounds.

It is important to know that shorter dogs should remain at the lower ends of this weight range.

Coat and Colors

The most common color form is a black and white tuxedo look, but this breed can have a solid black color as well as brown or yellow.

You can expect a short fine furred single coat with very dense fur – the coat may even be water resistant. You can also have pups with wavy and wiry fur from longer haired Dachshunds.

These dogs shed more than most single coated breeds because their coat is so thick, so make sure to brush them often (at least twice a week). As shedding naturally controls the length of their fur there is no need to give them a haircut.

Face masks are not necessary but may help with dirt and grime around the muzzle.

4 Fun Facts About The Lab Dachshund Mix

  1. Due to the size difference between a Lab and a Dachshund, artificial insemination is often needed to breed these dogs.
  2. Most Retrievers enjoy swimming and it is made possible by their waterproof fur. So your Lab Mix just might inherit that love of the water.
  3. As both parent breeds are hunting dogs they have an enhanced sense of smell that is passed down to this mix.
  4. Dachshunds are often known as wiener dogs, so Dachshund Lab Mixes are sometimes called wienerdors.

Personality and Temperament

A Dachshund On A Beech

Be prepared for a real wildcard when you bring one of these pups home.

You will never really know their temperament until you bring them home. The very best combination is a mix of the Labrador’s natural friendliness and the Dachshund’s protective nature.

A Lab Dachshund mix will be a devoted friend that will never leave your side.

One thing you can be sure of is that this dog will have a lot of energy. This hunting and sporting breed is born for the outdoors.

Your pooch will want to be walked often and played with even more, and will require games that tap into their high intelligence.

However once your pooch is all tired out they will climb right into your arms or curl up beside you to rest. If you have next door neighbors or you live in an apartment building, this is not the right breed for you. They are extremely vocal dogs and once they start barking they will not want to stop.

Just about anything can set these dogs off.

While they will love the companionship of a child, they should never be left unsupervised. Even play fighting can result in an injury from a bite or scratch.

Labradors are known for being friendly and happy dogs, but a Dachshund can be quite mean. Nasty bites are possible if the dog is alarmed or provoked.

Other pets may fall victim to this dog’s prey drive and territorial nature.

Is The Dachshund Lab Mix A Good Family Dog?

This breed’s undying devotion and protective nature makes it a great family dog.

However, like most sporting breeds they need a family that can keep up with its high energy.

Children will love this dog’s endearingly playful nature but should always be supervised carefully during their time together.

Caring for a Dachshund Lab Mix

A Lab Dachshund Mix

If you have previously kept either parent breed (Dachshund or a Labrador Retriever), be aware that you are getting an incredibly different dog with this mix.

This breed works best with owners that can allow a bit of noise and have plenty of patience for rambunctious behavior.

The house should have plenty of outdoor access.

These pups can be a real handful as there is no other breed quite like them. Anybody looking to own one should be ready for just about anything.

Exercise Requirements

Lab Dachshunds just love to walk and will want at least 60 minutes a day.

Dogs with Labrador builds can go for longer distances and take more strenuous courses than shorter mixes.

If your pooch resembles the Dachshund more then split the walks up.

Remember they have a high prey drive and tend to react to the environment around them so keep them on a leash while you walk.

Outside of walks they will need an additional 30 minutes of play each day. A long run or jog at your side is the perfect exercise for them.

  • Number of Walks Per Day: 2.
  • Total Exercise Needed Per Day: 60+ Minutes.

Grooming and Shedding

Dachshund Puppy

While most single coated dogs will only need a weekly brushing, you will need to brush this one twice a week no matter their coat length.

Shedding is moderate, but will increase during the spring and fall shedding seasons. Longer coated dogs have the added risk of painful tangles and mats.

Dental care is one of the most important and demanding aspects of grooming a Lab Dachshund mix. Brushing three times a week is necessary with annual trips to the vet for a full dental checkup.

Feeding and Diet

These dogs should be given dry food only and may benefit from a breed specific diet for Dachshunds.

You can give them 2 cups of quality dry kibble a day.

Avoid wet foods and raw meats as these may pack too many extra calories.

Any good high quality Dachshund food will have the right balance of fats, proteins and vitamins to fuel your dog’s active life.

Remember this breed is more obesity prone than other dog breeds, and their body shape makes excess weight even more of a risk.

There is no need to give them anything extra.

Calories Per Day: Cups of Kibble Per Day:
800 ~2

Known Health Problems

  • The biggest concern from the Dachshund side is the risk of intervertebral disc disease (IVDD). Their elongated backs leave their spines vulnerable to this very painful condition.
  • On the Lab side, this breed may inherit a gene that makes it more susceptible to obesity than others. This is one of the major reasons the breed needs a specialized diet.

The good news is that a genetic disposition is never a guarantee. Keeping your dog on a healthy diet and making sure they stay active will help prevent obesity, even when taking an increased appetite into account.

How Long Does A Dachshund Lab Mix Live?

A healthy Dachshund Lab mix can live anywhere from 12 to 15 years.

How Much Does A Dachshund Lab Mix Cost?

You can expect to pay anywhere between $400 and $600 for a Dachshund Lab mix puppy.

How To Train A Dachshund Lab Mix

Lab Dachshund Mix

This breed’s snooty attitude can make training quite a chore, so expect housebreaking to be particularly difficult.

Keep plenty of pee pads around and expect accidents to happen.

This is not the dog’s fault – their bladder is so small that they cannot hold it in as well as other dogs can.

You can help housebreak them by taking them to do their business first thing in the morning, when they finish a meal, or after a nap or a day at play.

Be sure to give them plenty of praise when they get it right.

Other important aspects of training include obedience and counter conditioning for unwanted barking and problematic behavior. Your stubborn pup may test your patience at every opportunity, so it is important that you remain firm but do not vent your frustration in front of them.

An intelligent dog like this certainly will not accept boredom.

They will love toys that move, light up or make sound. Puzzles and brain teasers are better for them than mindless chew toys.

A scavenger hunt is a great training game for any hunting hound.

Watch your smart scent hound sniff out each and every toy. You can even bury the toys and let your pup dig them up.

Quick Breed Summary Table

Breed Characteristics
Size: 15-25 inches.
Weight: 30-40lb.
Lifespan: 12-15 years.
Coat: Short or long single coat.
Color: The most popular is black, they can also be brown and yellow.
Do They Shed: Yes.
Temperament: Rambunctious, protective, talkative, stubborn and devoted.
Intelligence: High.
Socialization: Must be socialized young to remove territorial behavior.
Destructive Behavior: Can nip and bite when bored or aggravated.
People Skills: Can be unfriendly and rude around unfamiliar people.
Good with Children: Yes.
Activity Levels: Medium-high.

Summary

If you can handle this pup’s wild personality, you will find a loving and loyal little friend who will protect you and your family.

A Dachshund Lab mix will insist on long walks and new games to play every single day.

Give them the space to run and explore and make sure they are never left bored.

If you are a couch potato then be prepared to start a new active lifestyle!

This may be the most interesting furry friend that you will ever have. If you are looking for a unique and amusing pooch like no other, look no further than this lovable mix.

Let us know your questions in the comments section below…

Thomas Woods Face Portrait
Thomas has been a dog lover since he was 6 years old when his parents got him a rescue Labrador. Since then his love for dogs has lead him to study Animal Behavior & Welfare. He now keeps a six year old English Bullmastiff and educates pet parents through his online publication Perfect Dog Breeds.

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