Long Haired Dachshund Care Guide: Colors, Temperament And More…

Commonly known as a sausage dog, these little pups are perfect if you are looking for a small dog with a big personality.

They are hound dogs, bred for hunting, meaning they have strong prey drives and love to dig and chase anything that moves.

Long haired Dachshunds are 1 of 3 types of Dachshund, the other two being wire haired and smooth haired. They can be either miniature or standard.

Something to keep in mind is they will shed and need a lot of grooming – if this is something you don’t want, you should look for a shorter haired one.

Want to know more about this very cute and lively breed? Keep reading below…

What is a Long Haired Dachshund (Overview)

Running Long Haired Dachshund

The Dachshund originated in Germany around 600 years ago, their small size and great sense of smell were bred to hunt burrowing animals. Long haired Dachshunds were specifically bred to hunt in colder conditions.

They have been kept in royal courts all over Europe for centuries, including Queen Victoria.

It was only during the 1800s when the breed standard started to become more refined. This was during the same time their popularity increased in England and the United States. This is when the Dachshund became the breed we know and love today.

The long haired Dachshund still has a prey drive, they will be curious and chase anything that moves.

They are also very vocal and boisterous!

It can be difficult to train them, so be aware this breed generally is not for first time owners.

Their long hair needs brushing regularly to keep them looking their best.

They can also become hyperactive for little dogs, and will need to be walked once or twice a day. After their exercise, they tend to chill out and will love to cuddle up to you in the evenings.

Dachshunds are recognized by the American Kennel Club within the Hound group.

How Much Does A Long Haired Dachshund Cost?

A long haired Dachshund will cost between $300-2000 depending on their color and size (miniature or standard).

The good news they are recognized by the AKC, so you can use their puppy finder to find breeders that have been screened by the AKC and follow their rules and regulations.

Long Haired Dachshund Appearance

Long Haired Dachshund

The Dachshund is commonly called the sausage dog, most famous for their short legs, long bodies and pointy noses.

They are definitely longer than they are taller!

Depending on their coat color, they can have different eye colors, darker eyes are most common with darker coats and vice-versa.

Their short, but powerful legs have bigger front paws which makes them perfect for digging.

Height and Weight

The Dachshund stands very low to the ground.

  • Standard Sized: 8-9 inches.
  • Miniature Sized: 5-6 inches.

Standard sizes will weigh between 16-32lbs and 11lbs or under for miniature sizes.

Colors

Their official breed standard has 12 colors, but they can inherit a range of colors and markings including: Black and Cream, Black and Tan, Blue and Cream, Chocolate and Cream, Chocolate and Tan, Fawn and Cream.

You can also find some with solid colors such as: Red, Wheaten, Cream and Wild Boar.

The breed standard also accepts markings, these include: Brindle, Dapple and Sable.

Coat

As their name suggests, they have long hair!

They will generally have soft and silky coats, with feathering around their neck and ears. They will also have longer hair around their legs, tail and stomach.

Their hair may grow long enough to trail on the floor.

Long Haired Dachshund Temperament

Lying Down Dachshund

The Dachshund is a brave, curious and lively dog that is always doing something or trying to catch your attention.

They are very curious and always looking for something to do or chase.

With their strong sense of smell and expert digging skills, nothing will stop these little mischief makers digging up your backyard to catch a burrowing animal. It may be best to never leave your Dachshund alone in the backyard, just in case you catch them digging under your fence!

The Dachshund can be unpredictable around unfamiliar people. They can act aloof and can become very vocal.

When it comes to other dogs, they will try to fight them (especially bigger ones).

Smaller dogs are more aggressive and vocal, so be aware they are predisposed to being yappy and a little bit aggressive in situations that can be frightening.

In a study it was found that Dachshunds were more likely to be aggressive towards both people and dogs, but with the right socialization and training your Dachshund should not show these kinds of behaviors.

These little dogs may not be the most intimidating to trespassers, but they will definitely let you know if something is a-miss! They will become very vocal when there is something they don’t feel comfortable with going on in their home.

The Dachshund is very adaptable and can live in an apartment or in a big house in rural areas. As long as they get their daily exercise and enough mental stimulation, they will be happy little pooches.

This dog does not like being on their own for too long, so make sure you don’t leave them alone for more than an hour or two. If they get frustrated or lonely they will bark or chew.

Is A Long Haired Dachshund A Good Family Dog?

Dachshunds are not the best dog for a family with small children, as they tend to nip and bite younger children, especially when they tease or move quickly around them.

They are also not good around other dogs and pets, so it’s best to have a no-pets household when you bring them home.

Training Guide

Two Long Haired Dachshunds

The Dachshund can be stubborn and strong willed – once they have their mind on something there is not much you can do to stop them.

Whilst they may be intelligent, they won’t listen to you if they don’t feel like it.

This means you should train them when they are younger, particularly the recall command to prevent them from ignoring you when they are older. This will help with their strong prey drive and stop them from their hunting instinct taking over.

Due to their adorable puppy looks, you may be lenient with them but this can cause little dog syndrome (where they can become more dominant when matured because they got away with a lot as a pup).

Always use positive reinforcement and never use punishment as a training method as this can cause adverse behaviors.

Socialization is vital for a breed like the Dachshund when it comes to children and other pets. They should be introduced to a range of people, children and other dogs when young, to let them know what is right and wrong.

Let them know it’s a pleasant experience by encouraging them with treats and praise.

An unoccupied Dachshund is a destructive Dachshund! Keep them mentally stimulated otherwise your socks and furniture will suffer. Give them plenty of toys to chew if they do get bored or frustrated.

Play games with them – they have a strong sense of smell, so you could play hide and seek with their favorite treats.

Caring for a Long Haired Dachshund

A Dachshund

The Long Haired Dachshund will thrive in any loving home, they don’t mind living in apartments or in big houses.

This is a breed that should not be raised by a first time owner, as training can be hard work and difficult at times.

Having long hair, their grooming routine can be higher maintenance than other Dachshunds.

They also do not need too much exercise, but they are prone to gaining weight so don’t think that their daily walks are not important because they definitely are!

Exercise Requirements

Dachshunds are only small, meaning they don’t need too much exercise. Around 1 hour will do each day.

You will know when they need more exercise than usual if they become restless and hyperactive.

If they are not taken out for a walk regularly, they will become restless, frustrated and bored.

You can separate their daily walks into smaller bursts of activity, for example a 30 minute walk in the morning and another in the evening. Take them round the neighborhood and local dog parks.

It would be advisable to not take your Dachshund off the lead as they will most likely run off if they see a small animal in the distance. They are also unpredictable around unfamiliar dogs, so make sure you are confident your Dachshund okay in a dog park.

They love to follow new scents, so be sure to mix up your walking routes as much as you can and explore new places with your furry friend!

Grooming and Shedding

Being a long haired Dachshund, a regular grooming routine is needed.

Train them as a pup so they let you brush them often.

You can give them treats at the start so they know it’s a positive experience.

Their hair can reach the floor, so you can occasionally take your Dachshund to the groomers to give them a haircut! If it gets too long their fur can sweep up dirt wherever they go, causing tangles, matting and a dirty coat.

They don’t need frequent baths, only when they are particularly dirty or smelly. Bathing them too much can cause their skin to dry up because their natural oils will wash off.

Feeding and Diet

Dachshunds can put on lots of weight very easily, which is why sticking to a strict diet is important. If they do become overweight, it can hurt their back leading to slipped or ruptured discs.

No matter how cute they look, avoid giving them extra food or leftovers!

When you first get them as a pup, feed them the same food the breeder did (this avoids any tummy upsets).

As adults, Dachshunds will be fine on dry food that is high in quality, natural and low in artificial filler ingredients.

Known Health Problems

One of the most common health issues is Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) which is related to dwarfism, affecting their spines and causing short legs.

IVDD is inherited but can be tested for and trustworthy breeders will screen for it to reduce the risk of the pups getting the disease.

As a little dog, the Dachshund is prone to suffering from Patellar Luxation (dislocation of their kneecaps).

They also suffer from eye disorders such as Progressive Retinal Atrophy.

Dachshunds can also suffer from hormonal problems, such as Cushing’s syndrome – this is where there is too much Cortisol produced causing change of behavior, appetite, weight gain and hair loss.

As said before, they are very prone to being overweight, keep them active and keep to a strict diet. Obesity will cause spinal problems and other general health issues.

How Long Does A Long Haired Dachshund Live?

A healthy Dachshund will have an average lifespan of 12-16 years.

Quick Breed Summary Table

Breed Characteristics
Size: 8-9 inches (standard) and 5-6 inches (miniature).
Weight: 16-32lb (standard) and 11lb or under (miniature).
Lifespan: 12-16 Years
Coat: Long straight double coat that is soft and silky.
Color: Wide range of colors, including bi-colors and markings.
Do They Shed: Moderate shedders so regular brushing is needed.
Temperament: Lively, strong-willed, high prey drive and curious.
Intelligence: Above average.
Socialization: Unpredictable around other dogs, socialization is very important.
Destructive Behavior: Will like to chew and bark when frustrated, bored or lonely.
People Skills: Reserved around strangers, may show aggression.
Good with Children: May nip or bite kids, so will need socialization.
Activity Levels: Very active, will need at least 1 hour of activity a day.

Should You Get A Long Haired Dachshund? (Summary)

These unique and active dogs have found their way into people’s hearts and homes.

Even though they are small in stature, they have a big personality.

Your long haired Dachshund will love to chase, dig, chew and play. But they are also loving and loyal companions who are happy to curl up on the sofa with their owner after a long day.

Keeping them occupied is the key to stop them from becoming destructive and noisy, take them out for at least 1 hour a day.

Their grooming routine may be high maintenance and their training may be difficult, but it will all be worth it, just to have this little sausage as a best friend.

Do you have any questions? Talk to us in the comments section below…

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