Chug Dog Breed Information & Complete Owner’s Guide

The Chug dog is a mixed designer dog breed of two of the most popular small dog breeds; the Chihuahua and Pug.

They are loving dogs and will quickly become a member of the family through forming strong bonds with their family and become very attached.

With a cute little faces and a sweet temperament these small designer pooches are becoming increasingly popular.

This article will discuss what it’s like to own this dog breed, how-to care for them and train them whilst sharing dog breed information along the way.

What is a Chug Dog Breed? (Overview)

Chug Dog

The main purpose behind this designer mix is to be a confident companion pet – the same as their parent breeds.

Pugs and Chihuahuas have been used as companion animals for thousands of years by royalty and tribes:

  • The Pug originated in Ancient China, but, they looked a lot different back then. They had longer muzzles and legs compared to todays pugs. It wasn’t until the 1860 where they started to resemble the modern pug we know today. Pugs were associated with royalty across Europe, made popular by Queen Victoria.
  • The Chihuahua’s origin is from Mexico. The theory being they are descendant from tiny dogs from the Toltec civilization around 300BC. Modern Chihuahuas date back to the 1800s where Mexicans sold them to tourists.

Where Did the Chug Dog Come From?

The Chug’s origin is not as clear as their purebred parents, no one really knows who crossbred them first, when or why.

As this is a cross breed the American Kennel Club, and UK Kennel Club, do not recognize this breed, however, their parent breeds are recognized individually as toy breeds by both associations.

Chug Dog Appearance

Chug Appearance

As the Chug is a cross breed dog, its appearance can be a lottery, depending on the puppy’s genes.

Some puppys will look more like their Pug parent whilst others will look more like a Chihuahua. Some will look like neither parent and will be a mix and match of both.

Pugs and Chihuahuas both have big round heads and large eyes, but, this is where the common features stop. Typically, pugs have small button ears, while Chihuahuas have large ears. Pugs are also 2″ taller than Chihuahuas.

Height and Weight

As both Pugs and Chihuahuas are small, this mix will also be small lapdog. You can expect your mix to weigh between 10 to 20lb and should stand anywhere from 7 to 13 inches tall.

Height Size
Pug Chihuahua Chug Pug Chihuahua Chug
10 – 12″ 6 – 9″ 7 – 13″ 14 – 18 lb 3 – 7lb 10 – 20lb

Color Variations

This designer pooch can come in a variety of colors, due to its mixed breed status, ranging from:

  • Black
  • Fawn
  • Tan
  • Cream
  • Chocolate

Coat

Like other Chihuahua mixes, their coat is usually short and smooth – the same as both parent breeds. However, if a long haired chihuahua passes on its genes, this puppy can have an undercoat, long hair, fringe on the ears, long fur on the tail and feathering on the legs.

Chug Dog Personality

Chug Puppy Sitting

As this pooch is a cross breed, this makes it difficult to predict what kind of temperament each puppy will have.

We can have a look at each parent breed and see what temperament they have, as this gives us an informed idea on a Chug Dog’s personality.

It is important to remember that personality can also be influenced by socialization and environment.

This dog can inherit a Pug’s ability to form very strong bonds with their owner. They are very sociable and love attention, because of this they can become dependent on owners and develop separation anxiety.

Chihuahuas are very prone to yapping, they do this for a number of reasons, mostly because they are highly territorial and overprotective over their owners, toys and food. Because of this, your dog won’t be shy, they are enthusiastic, happy and love to draw attention on themselves.

Because of their Chihuahua parent a Chug Dog can become aggressive if socialization and training is not done correctly from a young age.

They typically won’t be dog friendly, due to the chihuahua in them, so it’s best to socialize them as much as possible at an early age.

However, they are great with other animals, like cats. If you already have a cat, introduce your pup gradually and carefully to your cat and they should get on fine.

Is A Chug Dog A Good Family Dog?

A recent study has shown that a dog is less prone to develop separation anxiety if living with a family.

However, you should keep in mind that Chihuahuas don’t deal well with kids, but, sometimes Pugs tend to be okay. So, it is difficult to predict if your mixed breed Chug will be okay.

Either way, it is best to avoid getting a Chug if you have small children in your family.

If you have older children, early socialization and training is vital to make sure you are confident your dog will be okay with kids. Always supervise your dog with kids and teach your children basic dog body language to avoid accidents.

How to Train A Chug Dog

Old Chug Dog

This dog can be easy to train, when they want to be they are fairly smart and are eager to please. But, they can also be very stubborn thanks to their Chihuahua genes.

You will need to be patient and consistent and start training your puppy from the moment you bring them home. To get the best results when training your dog, you should use positive reinforcement as your training technique.

Punishment methods and training has been shown to cause problematic behaviors and anxiety in dogs.

Give your dog a reward when they follow your command. Praise or treats will do very well, depending on what dog values the most.

Yapping can be a common problem behavior with Chihuahuas. Instead of using punishment, give them a treat when they stop barking or when they don’t bark in a situation when they normally do.

Early socialization is vital with a breed like this, as the Chihuahua in them can become aggressive without it. Expose your dog to a range of people and children, you should also take them to puppy classes.

Once you have finished a training session for the day, playing with your dog immediately after can be highly beneficial for your dog, as it can enhance your pups memory and decreases stress.

This dog will need mental stimulation, as does every dog. The pug especially is very playful and needs lots of toys to occupy themselves with; you can start with a puzzle feeder.

Caring for a Chug Dog

Chihuahua Mix Ears

This cross breed is fairly low maintenance dog to care, unlike their designer Cavachon cousin. They do not need much exercise so are perfectly suited for people who live in apartments. They also do not need too much grooming.

However, they do require a lot of attention and affection, so it is best to have a lifestyle where there is always someone home.

Exercise Requirements

The Chug Dog does not need too much exercise, a 30 minute walk each day will satisfy this small breed’s requirements. Chihuahuas, one parent breed, tends to be more energetic and are prone to yap and bark when they are bored. They will let you know they want to play and exercise.

Due to the flat face of the Pug, a Chug might not be too tolerant of exercise, and will need more recovery time.

If your mixed designer pooch doesn’t get enough exercise and mental stimulation, they will develop problem behaviors such as:

  • Random Barking and Yapping
  • Separation Anxiety

When taking your dog for a walk, keep them on a short leash and avoid dog parks as unliked the infamous Labrador’s ability to befriend dogs, this breed is not dog friendly.

This dog also does not do well in cold climates, be sure to wrap them up when it is cold while on a walk.

Grooming and Shedding

For a lapdog, this dog is fairly easy to groom, whether they have a long or short coat.

They shed throughout the year, so it’ll be best to brush them regularly (i.e. three times a week) to keep their coat tidy.

Inherited from the Pug, a Chug Dog might have wrinkles on their face. If they do, you should make sure they are kept clean, this can be done with a wet cloth or baby wipe.

As with every dog, you should clip their nails regularly to avoid overgrowth and splitting; especially because this dog doesn’t require log walks which would naturally keep their nails short.

Make sure you brush your dogs’ teeth regularly, as Chugs are prone to dental issues such as overcrowding and plaque.

To prevent ear infections, you should check your dogs’ ears and clean them of wax build up and debris.

Feeding and Diet

A healthy dog needs a balanced diet where all of their nutrients are taken cared of. Protein is a must in a dog’s diet, as it provides them with essential amino acids for muscle growth. Dogs need dietary fats to give them energy and keep their skin and hair healthy.

Whatever type of food you give your pooch is perfectly fine (i.e. dry, raw or rehydrated). However, make sure to read the label before you buy to be sure it is high quality, free of filler ingredients like corn-syrup and has high protein content (i.e. over 20%).

The Chug Dog is a small dog so will only need one cup of kibble a day divided into 2 equal meals, one in the morning and one in the evening. If in doubt, ask your vet or breeder.

Puppies should be fed the same food the breeder gave them to avoid stomach upsets. They should also be fed more frequently than a mature dog, with more protein.

Obesity is a common issue is small dogs, this can be prevented by exercising your dog regularly and not overfeeding them.

Known Health Problems

Cross breeds are generally healthier than purebred because there is more genetic variety so there is less chance of developing a genetic health issue. But, a puppy can still inherit common health issues from their parent breeds, Pugs and Chihuahuas are both prone to same health issues such as:

  • Hip dysplasia
  • Eye problems e.g. dry eye, cataracts
  • Obesity
  • Hypoglycaemia – low blood sugar
  • Patella Luxation
  • Prone to overheat in summer months

Pugs are Brachycephalic (i.e. flat faced) which can result in problems breathing, eye disorders, and dental issues too.

How Long Do Chug Dogs Live For?

A Chugs average lifespan is between 10 to 13 years of age.

Buyer’s Guide

Chug Dog in the Grass

Finding a reputable breeder is a must for this breed; because of their designer breed status.

Puppy farms can cause harm to a puppy that won’t be evident until you bring them home, so it is essential to know what to do when looking for a puppy:

  • Make sure you ask to see the litter, puppies and mom! Moms health and the way she interacts with her puppies is important. If a breeder doesn’t want you to visit, chances are they are not trustworthy.
  • You can ask the breeder if both parents are registered with American Kennel Club and see their documentation.
  • Ask for health and medical records for both parents, and history of vaccinations for your puppy. When looking for a breeder it is advised to find one that takes part in health screening to prevent any health issues being passed onto the puppies.
  • It is important to choose a breeder that has exposed their puppies to age-appropriate socialization.
  • A trustworthy breeder won’t be desperate to sell you a puppy and will want to ask you questions, to be sure you have the right lifestyle of their pup.

Remember

A puppy should be at least 8 weeks old to leave mom, some breeders may even wait until 12 weeks.

How Much Do Chug Puppies Cost?

A Chug will cost anywhere from $500-$800 USD based on the pedigree of their purebred parents. Because of their designer breed classification be sure you don’t support puppy mills buying cheaper puppies.

Quick Breed Summary Table

Breed Characteristics
Size: 7 to 12 inches tall
Weight: 10 – 20lb
Lifespan: 10-13 Years
Coat: Typically Short
Color: Varying colors and face markings: black, fawn, tan, cream, chocolate
Do They Shed: Yes, low to moderate
Temperament: Playful, loyal, protective and yappy
Intelligence: Average
Socialization: Early socialization is vital, especially with children
Destructive Behavior: Yapping and separation anxiety
People Skills: Strong bond with parents
Good with Children: No, only older children
Activity Levels: Energetic, short walks each day

Summary

The Chug Dog loves being at the center of attention and will form a strong bond with their parents. However, they are not too great with small kids and can become aggressive if not socialized correctly.

They don’t do well on their own for long periods of time and can become overly overprotective of their parents, territory and toys.

This designer mix inherits some health issues from the Pug, affecting their breathing and causing eye disorders. However, they are fairly low maintenance for grooming and exercise, but, will be very playful and will need lots of mental stimulation.

Overall, they are best suited for people who have the time to stay at home with them, no young children and who are prepared to train and socialize them.

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